Planting Plans

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Shawn Vanlandingham 5 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #84937

    Shawn Vanlandingham
    Participant

    As we are in the dead of winter and begin to plan our 2014 food plots, keep in mind that crop rotation is the best practice for keeping disease and pests away while helping to balance your soil.

    Things to know:

    Root plants rely mainly on potassium. Turnips, carrots, radishes, and other root crops are heavy potassium users. They also can break up compacted soils.

    Legumes put nitrogen back into the soil. Beans, clover and peas pull nitrogen from the air and store it on their roots.

    Grasses and flowers (corn, oats, sunflowers) love nitrogen

  • #85205

    baldsparrow
    Participant

    You gota love these tips, especially the one about crop rotation. If you have several plots, think about letting one stand idle for a season.

  • #85338

    sherej17
    Member

    Shawn, where do you get your seed for sunflowers? I read in an earlier post that you used bird seed? Would you get this at lets say farm and fleet?Anywhere they sell black oil sunflower bird seed?

  • #85343

    Shawn Vanlandingham
    Participant

    Paid $17.99 on sale for a bag at Farm & Fleet.

  • #85358

    sherej17
    Member

    got a 20 lb bag for 9.99. Do you think that would work with corn? With corn prices as high as the are, I was thinkin about trying a bag or maybe some sweet corn to mix in the plot?

  • #85361

    Shawn Vanlandingham
    Participant

    I think I would plant them side by side but not mixed in together. Otherwise the sunflowers will rob the corn of nutrients early and then just when you want the sunflowers to put on mass the corn will shade it out.

  • #85362

    sherej17
    Member

    Well, were having a tough time in making our deer feel safe eating in our food plot. We don’t hunt on wrong winds and we stay outta there until we get pictures of big bucks or just when the rut is on. Its just difficult when you have a road next to the plot. I am thinking that the only way for a big buck to feel safe enough to feed during daylight, is to have some kind of taller cover mixed in with the plot. Weve tried screens and just doenst work in hill country. Plots in a valley and road is about a 1/4 of the way up. I hunt another property where the farmer rotates crops and I tend to see way more deer when corn is planted as compared to beans and winter wheat. There is two new food mixes where they plant buckwheat in the mixes, and buckwheat grows tall, but is very hard to rid of when it goes to seed. I don’t know how its going to turn out but what do we have to lose?

  • #85364

    Shawn Vanlandingham
    Participant

    How tall of a screen do you need? Have you tried the screen made by Frigid Forage? The sunflowers you purchased are black oil and they only grow up to 4 1/2 feet. The sunflowers that grow taller cost significantly more and require a little more work. Buckwheat will not get tall enough to act as a screen, it’s a nice Summer food source and cover crop for late summer or fall plantings.

    If anything, have an outer strip of corn with a strip of sunflowers inside and then have something like clover or big & beasty in the center. While it will help create a nice buffer it might not be enough to hide your movements to and from the stand. If that is the case you can accept it as it is or try to change your stand approach.

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